FREE Group Meditation on the Beach

Earlier this month, I participated in the insightful and inspiring Mindfulness in America summit in New York City hosted by Anderson Cooper.

The benefits of meditation on our brains and our stress levels are well-documented in the scientific community. One of the seminar participants noted that even 8 minutes a day has immediate results, and over time will leave a positive, lasting impact on our brains.

One of the topics they discussed was the value of group meditation.  An organization called “The Big Quiet” is flourishing in New York City and their success motivated me to start a monthly Fort Myers Beach meditation for Wishful Thinking Works.  If you are in the area join us, if not check out this virtual meditation event!

We are gathering Sunday, November 5, 2017 at 9:30 am by Pincher’s Restaurant on Fort Myers Beach, FL.

How to participate:

• Bring a towel or blanket and an open heart and mind. If you prefer a chair and coffee, no problem, but still bring that open heart and mind! Everyone is welcome, so bring a friend or two.

• Head to Pincher’s Restaurant on Fort Myers Beach. There should be plenty of parking on a Sunday morning at this time of year.

• Then walk across the beautiful, soft sand to the water’s edge. I will be waiting for you.

• After a welcome and introductions, we will sit quietly together looking out at the sea for 20 minutes.  We will do 10 minutes of a guided meditation and 10 minutes on Individual.

• Afterwards, folks can share about the experience and talk a bit.

• If you like we can head to the restaurant for coffee or breakfast, or simply sit longer on the beach, or head home

Until then . . . here are some meditation links from “The Big Quiet” to get you started. This 5-minute mini-meditation is a gentle way to begin. 

Also, check out the Wishful Thinking Women FREE 21-day Virtual Meditation Meetup activity that begins October 30.

Join us to find a bit more peace in your heart and relaxation and happiness in your life.

 

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Change your life!

 

Guided Goodness – Free Meditation Series

If you have never tried meditating, or if you meditate and would like to add to your practice, join us for Making Every Moment Matter Oprah and Deepak Chopra’s upcoming, free 21-day meditation series.

I have used Oprah and Deepak’s meditations in the past, and they are guided goodness and a refreshing way to calm your mind and comfort your soul. Meditations are usually 15 minutes in length – a small amount of time that can yield big results.

  • There are thousands of studies showing the benefits of meditation.
  • You do not have to meditate for long periods to begin receiving the benefits.
  • Benefits include: reduced anxiety, easing pain, and improving sleep

To enrich your life and create new levels of awareness, insight and joy sign-up for their free meditation series, which begins Monday, October 30.

Then join the free  Wishful Thinking Works Meditation Facebook Group, which is designed to help you develop the meditation habit by

  • providing accountability – studies how this is key when developing any new habit,
  • to celebrate your successes – also so important when trying something new,
  • and to give you a place to share your thoughts and questions with others going through the same process.

It’s a virtual support group for your new journey!

meditation-567593_960_720The Wishful Thinking Works Meditation Facebook Group is open to everyone, it is listed as “closed” on FB, but that just means no one but members can see your posts. You have nothing to lose and so much gain.

Join us to find more peace in your heart and happiness in your life. You deserve this and more, and it is all free!

Register for your Free Wishful Thinking Works Discovery Session!

Visit Wishful Thinking Works on Facebook for posts and updates.

 “Like” Wishful Thinking Works on Facebook.

Need a break?

All you have to do is sit back and listen. Ten minutes of relaxation can start your day off or renew it along the way.  Using our imaginations while we rest is a great way to give ourselves a break.

Give it a try.

Developing mindfulness

Patrice Koerper  Life Coach Wishful Thinking MindfulnessIncreasing your mindfulness is a great way to center, relax, and refresh yourself.

Becoming more mindful or more aware, will help you focus on what really matters to you and will allow you to live or define your purpose and to ignite your passion for living with purpose. It can provide you with new energy, enthusiasm, and motivation.

Like the words of a good friend or a caring, loving parent or mentor, mindfulness can pave the way or provide a sense of permission to help you erase any lingering doubts that you have the right to live with passion and purpose.

Mindfulness takes practice, but is a warm and kind way to treat yourself, to allow your dreams to surface and grow, and to give thanks and wings to who you really are or want to be.

Here’s how to develop daily mindfulness . . .

As you go through your day and doubts or recriminations enter your mind, stop what you are doing, take a deep, slow, breathe and gently tell yourself “As I follow my passion, the world becomes a better place.”

If that particular sentence doesn’t work for you, create one that does and use it throughout the day to build your confidence and to create space in your mind and heart for peace and tranquility and new pathways for positivity. The more meaningful the sentence you create is to you, the more likely you will be to remember and use it. Using it will create the space your need to grow more mindful by allowing you to control what you choose to focus on any moment.

Living with purpose can be as personal as wanting to be the best person, friend, staff member, mom, sister, aunt, dad, brother, or uncle you can be. It can be as global as righting social wrongs and inequalities and saving lives. It can be fueled by the fun of inspiring others to learn, sing, dance, paint, read or write or the creative satisfaction of doing those things yourself.

True passion is like slipping into your favorite jeans or pajamas. It’s not fueled by anger or resentment. It’s based on understanding, compassion and joy. Pursuing your passion, feels good – or at least worthwhile – even when challenges arise. True passion and purpose provide the energy and creativity to move forward or around obstacles and provide a soft place for you to fall at the end of each day. Living with purpose it not always easy, but it is rewarding.

You alone get to choose your purpose. And, as long as you choose, you can’t get it wrong, because if you choose it for yourself you are on the right path.

This post was inspired by mindful moments of peace and passion experienced while listening to 21 Days of Gratitude, for which I am very thankful! My favorite sentence thus far is –“With profound gratitude, I live my purpose.”

Simply asking yourself “What’s new?” can make a huge difference in your life.

Even though we read more and more often how good meditating is for us, many folks are still reluctant to do it. Others want to try it, but don’t know how to get started.

Meditation is a form of mindfulness, so I was excited to read and am happy to share with you some tips on becoming more mindful from the blog of Ellen J. Langer an award-winning social psychology researcher, professor, and author of 11 books including Mindfulness. (I added the bullets and italics to the excerpt below.)

“We’ve been researching mindfulness without meditation for over thirty five years.

  • Actively drawing novel distinctions is the essence of mindfulness.
  • One can simply ask themselves how the person they live with, the job they are doing, or/and the environment they are in is different is several ways from the day before and make a practice of looking for novelty.
  • When we travel we expect everything to be new and so we notice, become engaged, and enjoy ourselves. The problem is that when we’re not on vacation we suffer from an illusion of stability and think everything we once experienced is the still the same.
  • Everything is always changing and looks different from different perspectives. Bringing that expectation of not knowing to our daily lives will encourage us to actually notice  and be in the present.”

Taking a few moments to really notice your surroundings, your breathing, or how your body feels is a form of mindfulness. It’s being in the moment, which interrupts the often stressful, rapid-fire stream of thoughts constantly racing through our brains.

Mindfulness is a way to give your mind a break and it’s as easy as asking yourself, “What’s new?”

Sounds like the perfect pick-me-up!

 

 Wishful Thinking Works Life Coaching.

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Mental sludge, emotional oil spills

I just began reading “Joyful Wisdom: Embracing change and finding freedom” by Yongey Mingyur Rinchope, a well-respected Tibetan meditation master. Ten pages in and I was already making notes to share with you.

He describes our feelings of helplessness as sludge; I am calling it “mental sludge.” 

Are are you picturing the horrible, thick, gooey black substance that clogs your bathtub drains (sure, sure, not yours) – Yuk, or maybe your sewer lines – Gross, or worse yet, the beautiful waters of the Gulf of Mexico – Devastating? 

Mental sludge is just as big a threat to our happiness and to creating the lives we want as the oil sludge in the Gulf of Mexico is to our environment. 

Rinchope describes sludge as the feeling we get when we are in the middle of a negative or sad thought or situation, and we begin to think “this is the way I am, this is the way life works, there’s nothing I can do to change it.”

Mental sludge. 

Okay, so that got me thinking: I have areas of mental sludge in my life – and, if we are really being honest, which I am – I have, at times, had vast wastelands of mental sludge, which have led me to what I am now calling “emotional spills:” nasty little outbursts of thoughts and words that just like the oil spill in the Gulf, have ripple effects that spread far and wide and can affect me and those around me for years to come.

Sometimes, I have let my fears such as: being late; not getting the job done; not doing it well enough; not making the best __________; being the best _______ ; having the nicest or cleanest  ________; the smartest  ________ or whatever my momentary complaint is, lead me to think and say things I would rather not.

Most of the verbal oil I spew is directed solely at myself, but sometimes, it seeps out toward others: Hey, that guy just cut me off; She looks _______; I can’t believe they expect me to _______; She/he is always ________; They never _________; and one of my favorites” You/they should . . .  (All of these are hard to admit and, of course, there are much uglier examples – I am honest but not a masochist. :-)

I believe that most of the negative comments we make to ourselves, our loved ones and anyone else, who happens by when we are “spilling,” are the result of some level of mental sludge clogging our spirits and preventing us from creating the life we want.   

I began facing my mental sludge years before I named it, which was just a few days ago, thanks to Rinchope – and noticed that when I do face the sludge, my emotional spills became less frequent and much less intense. 

Here’s what works for me:

1. Being aware of my mental sludge: the negative thoughts and thought patterns that keep me stuck.  Awareness is always a good first step.  Notice what you are thinking in times of stress or sadness. Then, look for patterns. 

2. Learning to recognize them for what they are: thoughts, not prophecies.  Try not to judge yourself.  One mistake or failure does not a loser make.  In fact, a million mistakes and failures do not, and all the negative stuff we tell ourselves is just us telling ourselves negative stuff. It is not fact, nor written in stone – anywhere. (Same for all the stuff others tell us – their thoughts, not fact.)

3. Mentally rewarding myself for being able to recognize and label my thoughts:  Hey, good job, Patrice. (Sort-of like my friend’s adorable two-year old nephew, who tells her all the time, “Good job, I am proud of you!”)   

By the time I make it to Step 3, the original thought(s) has passed, and that big old pile of mental sludge that was so overwhelming has disappeared.  Pretty, simple, huh?  And, it works.

Rinchope calls that mindfulness.  I call it wonderful.

To clean-out your spiritual pipes, repeat Steps 1-3, which you will probably need to do often in the beginning, but try not to judge yourself or your progress, just repeat the steps, as needed.

Now, let’s find a solution for the spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

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