Taking in the Good

I wanted to share a quick and easy way to bring more joy into your life. Rick Hanson, Ph.D. is a neuropsychologist, who has written a number of books on the technique, which he calls “Taking in the Good.” Other folks describe a similar method, known as savoring. No matter the name, it is a simple, fast way to refresh your outlook or your state of mind.

Begin by selecting a positive moment from your life – past, present or something you would like to create in the future, and then close your eyes and create an image of the moment in your mind. Stay with the image for 30-60 seconds.

Let your mind wander and daydream a bit about your moment – fill in as many details as you can. Relive, notice, or create lots of sensory relationships in your mind to your image – sights, smells, sounds, etc. and think about how good you felt/feel/or will feel about your joy-filled memory or moment.

Keep going until you actually feel a difference in your body. You might find yourself smiling, or your shoulders relaxing or wiggling a bit. You may feel sensations flowing through your entire body or you might get goose bumps! When you feel like you are there your brain will react accordingly and release a bouquet of goodness.

Your moments to not have to be momentous, although they will work, as well. I savor each and every lattè or cappuccino I drink, and I always feel as though I have been on a mini-vacation! It is so relaxing.

If you savor your personal positives 6 times a day – for a total of only 5-10 minutes – you will not only change your brain chemistry while you are savoring it, over time you will rewire your brain to think and feel more positively.

Set an alarm on your phone or with Alexa to remind you throughout the day to pause and savor. Or get in the habit of “Taking in the Good” each time you get a cup of coffee, brush your teeth, wake-up, go to sleep – anything you do on a regular basis can be a great reminder for you.

Don’t worry about doing the process 6 times a day when you begin, simply start! If you remember to develop and embellish your thought – you will feel the effects immediately as your brain releases happy chemicals and hormones that help your brain cells connect. It’s science, and it works.

Go for it, “Take in the Good,” or savor a moment right now!

2020! New decade, new you!

Happy New Year!

Let’s start at the very beginning! A very good place to start!

When Julie Andrews, as Maria, sang “Do-Re-Mi” to the children in movie “The Sound of Music”, she was encouraging them and making singing fun. Maria wanted to give them the confidence and courage they needed to enjoy a new aspect of life, and that is exactly what I want to do for you today.

I am sharing with you today two FREE resources to help you create the life you really want through positive reflection and insight, which will increase your confidence and your courage, and maybe even make you feel like you are on a mountain top singing! (The resources are great to do with kids and teens, as well.)

1. Wishful Thinking Works 2019 Year in Review “Ta Da” List

The first resource is the Wishful Thinking Works 2019 “Ta Da” List, the first version of which I developed in 2012 to help you live your best life by reflecting on and savoring the good already in your life. My “Ta Da” List has been so effective in reminding me of what was good in my life, that I no longer wait an entire year to use it to reinforce the goodness that has come my way or to review the positives I have achieved.

I complete my “Ta Da” List during the first week of the New Year and then again around the 4th of July, which is Independence Day in the U.S.A. My twice a year habit gives me both confidence and courage, and when I review and savor each entry, my brain is flooded with positive chemicals and hormones that can create the same level of joy and excitement the original event did. I love that it is like a two-for-one sale in my brain! And, who doesn’t love a good sale. especially at this time of year?

It is so much easier for us to focus on our sad times and our real and perceived losses than it is for us to savor the good ones, using your Wishful Thinking Works 2019 “Ta Da” List will help you redirect your energies, ramp-up your enthusiasm and reinforce your commitment to living your best life.

2. Wishful Thinking Works 2020 Predict Success “Ta Da” List

Using your Wishful Thinking Works 2020 Predict Success “Ta Da” List is a fun way to design your future. It can help you give a totally new direction to your life, or simply create new pathways for you to enjoy.

To use your 2020 Predict Success “Ta Da” List, simply list all the things you want to happen in 2020 – big or small – as if they already have happened and how having them or accomplishing them has made you feel.

EX: “I feel fantastic that I finished my degree. It was tough, but I am so proud of myself for keeping at it. I learned so much about myself and the world by pursuing this degree. I feel so happy about getting it.” Remember, you do not have to have the degree in 2020, only the desire to start or finish it – you are predicting your success.

Be bold. Be brave. Don’t censor yourself or your dreams. I have been predicting success for myself for more than a decade and so many of my dreams have become a reality – my Masters degree, serving 3 times in the Peace Corps, travel beyond my expectations, a loving relationship, warm supportive friendships, living my purpose daily and so much more.

Don’t be afraid of your future – predict and then picture it! The Wishful Thinking Works 2020 Predict Success “Ta Da” List is one page and will get you started, but I encourage you to transfer the categories to a notebook so you can fully explore and write about your new life throughout 2020.

 

Wishing you the happiest of New Year’s and the confidence and courage to believe in yourself and your potential and the possibilities that exist for you in the decade ahead. Wishful Thinking Works – go for it!

wtw-logo-patrice-koerper-life-coach-motivational-speaker 2019
Your life is your once in a lifetime opportunity; what you do with it is up to you.” 
Patrice K. Robson

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Day 9 of Oprah and Deepak’s Meditation 21 Day Series

Loving Oprah and Deepak’s Grace Through Gratitude 21-Day Meditation Series and allowing gratitude and grace to be a expanded part of each day.

Feeling greatful* for taking the time to slow down long enough to watch this guy in our backyard! He arrived early yesterday and spent the night! (*My version of the word “grateful” because that is how it makes me feel, GREAT!)

What is making you feel greatful these days?

In the series Oprah and Deepak remind us how good feeling gratitude feels! The changes to your heart and soul are life enhancing and can help you bring positivity and grace into your life.

Wishing you blue skies, sweet adventures and moments of heartfelt gratitude today and everyday.

Warm regards,

Patrice

Communication worth savoring

Me on trainI have been writing about savoring for years and have made it part of my daily life, because it is an amazing feeling and brings such insight and joy. But I never thought about savoring communication until I read this article, and checked out the research of University of Arizona researcher Maggie Pitts.

Pitts analyzed online responses after asking respondents whether or not they savored communication and if so, for a detailed example of an experience they had savored.

“Savoring is the process of (1) identifying a pleasant experience, (2) noticing that you are feeling pleasure about that experience, and then (3) feeling good about feeling pleasure” Maggie Pitts

From their responses Pitts identified seven different types of communication that people tend to savor:

1) Aesthetic communication. Survey respondents savored this type of communication because of some aspect of how it was presented—timing, delivery, choice of words or perhaps a surprise twist. An inspiring speech, good play on words or suspenseful announcement might fall in this category.

2) Communication presence. This category includes conversations in which participants reported being so deeply engaged and completely in the moment with another person that it felt as if no one else mattered. These types of exchanges often were described as “real” or “entirely honest.”

3) Nonverbal communication. From to physical contact to facial expressions, these exchanges emphasize nonverbal cues. A meaningful hug or smile might fall in this category.

4) Recognition and acknowledgement. This category encompasses communication in which participants were publicly acknowledged or offered appreciation, like an awards ceremony or a speech honoring an individual.

5) Relational communication. This category includes communication that establishes, confirms or gives insight into a relationship, such as a couple’s discussion about the future together or an intimate disclosure that brings two people closer.

6) Extraordinary communication. Many participants savored communication around special moments, such as a wedding, illness, birth of a child or other “landmark memories.”

7) Implicitly shared communication. This category includes unspoken communication experiences that may be more difficult to articulate, such as feeling the excitement of a crowd around you, or looking at someone and instinctively knowing that you are sharing the same feeling.

I love that learning something new about savoring has brought even more joy to my life, and I quickly realized that I do savor many of the conversations I have had with people throughout my life and each of those still brings me joy. Here are some of the most memorable as this moment:
  • a conversation we had in my 10th grade social science class about how people approach living and their choices;
  • a talk with a friend who was dying of leukemia;
  • listening to my sons when they were little and discovering the world around them and much later when they were in college and just after, as they explored a much larger world;
  • a fellow Peace Corps Volunteer on the train to Skopje – the capital of Macedonia;
  • talks with friends of shared books and movies;
  • a presentation on music, art and math by Richard G. Brown, the father of Da Vinci Code author, Dan Brown and a much honored math professor
  • the hundreds and hundreds of rich and wonderful conversations with my dearest friends at the happiest, most exciting, or the most trying times of my life,
  • and the deep, touching and heartfelt conversations I have with my husband almost daily.
I am now looking forward to reading the books Pitts edited on positive communication, which hopefully will create more conversations for me to savor. I already like the way she thinks, “Maggie takes a “bright side” approach to the study of human communication — asking questions like, “what is going right” here, and “how can we make good things even better?”
I hope you find lots of wonderful moments and communications to savor, today and all the days ahead for you.
As I was writing this post in the early morning hours, I took a moment to savor the water color view through the screen on my balcony on a softly unfolding morning in tropical Florida.
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